Projects & Impact

AHP has built its business on applying best practices, many of which we have helped to shape, and real-world, hands-on knowledge to improving systems and business practices for our clients.

In all of the work that we do, we are guided by our mission to improve health and human services systems of care and business operations to help organizations and individuals reach their full potential.

Search Projects by Category

Select items in one or more of four categories to find relevant project types:

Something went wrong please try again later.

Access to Recovery (ATR) [Commonwealth of Massachusetts, DPH/BSAS]

AHP has been running this federal grant from SAMHSA since 2010. It is a program designed to give people with substance use disorders wider access to community services that help them on their road to recovery. Clients choose recovery support services they think will help them most in their recovery by using vouchers they are given to secure these services. Examples of services include: care coordination, basic critical needs support (clothing, IDs), public transportation passes, health and mental health supports and employment training. ATR gives participants the dignity of self-sufficiency and the hope for a future in recovery. 

This project is being implemented in the Greater Springfield and Greater Boston areas and has recently expanded to Worcester and New Bedford, when ATR was rolled under the Commonwealth’s STR (State Targeted Response to the Opioid Epidemic) grant. AHP’s accomplishments in this contract are summarized below.
 
  • For the relatively low cost of an average of $1,865 per participant for the 6-month program, ATR saves the Commonwealth money and saves lives. During one grant year alone, $4 million went back into the local economy by paying providers for the services they provided to the participants and by paying participants a work-study benefit when they attended job training programs.
  • Key to the tremendous success of ATR is the focus on employment through job readiness training, job search assistance, and occupational training. Job training is provided to participants with a recognition that they have complex needs and benefit from customized approaches to employment training. The ATR employment program, called the Career Building Initiative (CBI) is a national model for successful job readiness and occupational training for people in early recovery from substance use disorders.
  • AHP developed a provider network to deliver services grounded in principles of recovery.
  • ATR allows for a client-driven approach to care through a collaborative and continuous recovery planning with the help of an ATR care coordinator.
  • ATR coordinators are continuously trained on recovery planning, motivational interviewing, and engagement techniques, resulting in successful engagement with the participants throughout their time in the program.

Related resources and publications: www.ma-atr.org

Heartland Health Outreach Research Technical Assistance Project

AHP worked with Heartland Health Outreach (HHO), a community-based organization that provides medical, dental, behavioral health care and housing to vulnerable populations, to identify organizational research strengths and program evaluation needs. AHP conducted key stakeholder interviews with HHO administrators, reviewed HHO research implementation strategies, and recommended health care reform-related performance measurements. AHP also worked with HHO leadership to disseminate its research-related projects at a national level.
 
Related resources and publications:
 
  • Pickett, S.A. & Batia, K. (2015). Integrated Health Care for People with Psychiatric Disabilities: Introduction to the special issue. American Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitation, 18(1), 1-4. Retrieved from www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15487768.2015.1001689.
  • Pickett, S.A., Luther, S., Stellon, E., & Batia, K. (2015). Making Integrated Care a Reality: Lessons Learned From Heartland Health Outreach's Integration Implementation. American Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitation, 18(1), 87-104. Retrieved from www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15487768.2015.1001698

SAMHSA’s Homeless and Housing Resource Network

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) contracted with AHP to provide training and technical assistance (TA) on housing and homelessness to SAMHSA Homeless Program Branch grantees and other homeless housing and service providers operating across the U.S. states and territories. Homeless housing and service programs are united by a vision of ending homelessness by supporting individuals through a process of change as they improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to reach their full potential. The goals of this project include the following:The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) contracted with AHP to provide training and technical assistance (TA) on housing and homelessness to SAMHSA Homeless Program Branch grantees and other homeless housing and service providers operating across the U.S. states and territories. Homeless housing and service programs are united by a vision of ending homelessness by supporting individuals through a process of change as they improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and strive to reach their full potential. HHRN focuses on four of SAMHSA’s strategic initiatives: trauma and justice; military service members, veterans, and their families; recovery support; and data, outcomes, and quality. The goals of this project include:

  • Promoting the adoption of best practices for serving people who are experiencing homelessness or are at risk of becoming homeless and have chronic mental illness or co-occurring disorders;
  • Increasing workforce capacity through TA and training;
  • Disseminating information to the homeless services field in support of SAMHSA’s strategic initiatives;
  • Collaborating with other agencies and organizations to improve the coordination of SAMHSA activities focused on addressing homelessness and building effective partnerships; and
  • Measuring meaningful change.
The HHRN TA team is led by AHP and includes partners HomeBase, Policy Research Associates (PRA), JBS International, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and Abt Associates. Key accomplishments of SAMHSA’s HHRN project include the following:

  • Conducting 147 webinars on 73 topics;
  • Offering 24 PATH HMIS learning community seasons this year to SAMSHA grantees;
  • Providing responses to grantee TA requests, including approximately 75 requests per month through the PATH PDX Help Desk;
  • Leading workshops at conferences and conducting virtual workshops at state conferences;
  • Providing onsite technical assistance with follow-up remote sessions to work through challenges of implementation;
  • Providing intensive and light-touched remote TA to grantees; and
  • Facilitating communities of practice (CoP), including two CoPs using the Project ECHO Model.


AHP updated, enhanced, and field tested two evidence-based practices toolKITs focused on people experiencing homelessness—the Permanent Supportive Housing KIT and the Integrated Treatment for Co-occurring Disorders KIT [CC: open links in new windows]. In addition, HHRN has conducted multifaceted, interagency policy academies on chronic homelessness (CH). In collaboration with other federal agencies, HHRN led two policy academies on youth homelessness on outreach and engagement to people experiencing unsheltered homelessness.
 
Related resources and publications:
 

  •  
  •  
  •